Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)

If you belong to that significant minority of people, who has a more finely-tuned nervous system, it’s important to learn what aspects of your sensitivity can change and what is here to stay. You can start thriving, when you focus on creating a life-style that fits you well and stop going against the grain of you by trying to change essential and integral aspects of you. If you are new to the idea of high sensitivity, you can find some useful information on this page about this genetically inherited trait that affects about 15-20% of people.

Even if you think that you are not highly sensitive yourself, finding out more about this trait can potentially improve your relationships with your partner, your children, your colleagues and any other loved ones – including your pets – if they are highly sensitive. (You maybe interested to know that researches have identified this trait in at least 100 other species of animals too!) If you already know about high sensitivity and are aware why it is a hugely significant diversity issue, you can also find services, books and links relevant for HSPs here.

        * Brighton HSP Network
        * HSP News

How can I tell if I am a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)?

Based on the research findings of Dr. Elaine Aron, there are four general categories of symptoms indicating that you have a highly sensitive nervous system, also known as, Sensory Processing Sensitivity (SPS). Highly Sensitive People (HSPs) have greater depth of processing; i.e. you feel and think more deeply than average, which means that you tend to reflect more before acting or speaking and find decision making difficult, but generally tend to make good ones. You also have a greater tendency for overarousal, which may mean that you show unusual nervousness or chronic stress, have difficulty with transitions and prefer to avoid highly stimulating situations. HSPs also tend to have greater emotional intensity, which means that both your positive or negative feelings can be stronger than average in all situations where emotions are appropriate, although how much of this you actually express can vary greatly. And finally, you also show signs of sensory sensitivity, which can mean that you are able to distinguish more subtleties with your senses and/or have lower threshold for noticing and/or low tolerance of high levels of sensory input. This means that you may be more sensitive to loud sounds, rough textures, strong smells or cold drafts than the average person.

If you have some of these symptoms, you can take an online Self-Test to determine, if you are a Highly Sensitive Person. I also encourage you to check out the HSP Links on this website for more information or by the book: The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Survive and Thrive When the World Overwhelms You

What difference does it make if I am a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)?

Highly sensitive people were born with a more finely tuned central nervous system, which can process more subtle information and also tend to think and feel more deeply than the average person. About 15-20% of people have this characteristic, and just like other personality traits, this seems to be fairly constant throughout your life. In spite of the many benefits of being an HSP, like being more creative, conscientious, thoughtful and reliable, you may not like some of the other symptoms, like needing more downtime or feeling easily overwhelmed when too much is going on. But high sensitivity is a package deal and part of who you are, so it can save a lot of heartache to know what is best to accept about yourself and not waste your life trying to fight it. Your sensitivity is a real gift, if you learn to use its advantages and cope well with its challenges. Knowing whether you are highly sensitive or not, also can make a real difference in your therapy, as we can focus on healing your hurts and creating a life that suits your temperament, instead of getting stuck with trying to change things about you that are innate parts of you. The difference can really mean knowing how to stop just surviving and start thriving!

What kind of counselling suit best HSPs?

If you are highly sensitive, it can be very beneficial to look for a counsellor who had some training in working with HSPs or at least read books about this trait. Awareness about this is a lot more important than whether your counsellor is highly sensitive or not or the therapeutic approach used. Of course, there are plenty of advantages of working with a highly sensitive therapist, as you will probably feel more comfortable about talking about your issues and feel well heard. Your highly sensitive counsellor will also have personal experience of coping with intense emotions, overarousal or other problems associated with being an HSP. If you are looking for counselling at the moment, give me a call on 07979 604 554, as I am a highly sensitive counsellor and also have training in working with high sensitivity. If you are already in therapy, you can also ask your therapist to read one of Dr. Elaine Aron’s books or at least read the information on her website, which can make a real difference for your progress and how much you feel understood by your therapist. You can also find there an excellent article about how to discuss your sensitivity with your therapist.

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